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Original article

The effect of a projected virtual reality training environment on vision symptoms in undergraduates

Authors:

Meritxell Cristino Amenós ,

Eye and Vision Science, University of Liverpool, Liverpool; Orthoptics and Optometry, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool
About Meritxell Cristino
BSc (Hons) Orthop DOO(EC) DipTP(IP)
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Paul C. Knox

Eye and Vision Science, University of Liverpool, Liverpool
About Paul C.
PhD CBiol MIBiol
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Abstract

Aim: Virtual reality (VR) systems induce a range of unwelcome symptoms in a proportion of the population. A similar phenomenon has been reported with 3D presentation systems. Given the increasingly wide deployment of such systems, we investigated the effect of exposure to a projected VR training simulation on a group of undergraduates.

Methods: Two groups of students attended two teaching sessions using a 3D stereoscopic backprojector system with active stereo glasses. One group was given a full orthoptic and optometric assessment before they attended their first session. Participants completed the Virtual Reality Symptom Questionnaire (VRSQ) before and after both sessions.

Results: While no participant reported any gross discomfort after either session, there was a statistically significant increase in VRSQ symptom scores from pre- to post-exposure in the first session that was not observed in the second session. Pre-exposure scores were statistically significantly different between sessions; analysis of the difference between individual pre- and post-exposure results from both sessions revealed no consistent effects. There was a statistically significant correlation between prism fusion amplitude and symptom scores.

Conclusions: We found no evidence of uncomfortable symptoms in a group of undergraduate students. Projected VR systems, in which participants are largely passive observers, are less likely to induce eye symptoms than head-mounted systems which make higher demands on the visual system. We also found that in a typical undergraduate class there were a number of students with no or low stereopsis who could derive no benefit from a VR system.

DOI: http://doi.org/10.22599/bioj.84
How to Cite: Amenós, M.C. & Knox, P.C., (2014). The effect of a projected virtual reality training environment on vision symptoms in undergraduates . British and Irish Orthoptic Journal . 11 , pp . 39–45 . DOI: http://doi.org/10.22599/bioj.84
Published on 01 Aug 2014.
Peer Reviewed

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