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The relationship between ophthalmic deficits and functional ability in low birth weight children

Authors:

Vicki Wong ,

Orthoptic Department, Walton Hospital, Rice Lane, Liverpool, L9 1AE, GB
About Vicki

BMedSci (Hons)

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Anna R. O’Connor,

Walton Hospital, Aintree University Hospital, Liverpool and Division of Orthoptics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, GB
About Anna R.

PhD BMedSci (Hons)

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David Newsham,

Walton Hospital, Aintree University Hospital, Liverpool and Division of Orthoptics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, GB
About David

PhD MSc DBO

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Paul C. Knox,

Walton Hospital, Aintree University Hospital, Liverpool and Division of Orthoptics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, GB
About Paul C.

PhD BSc(Hons) CBiol MIBiol

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David Clark

Walton Hospital, Aintree University Hospital, Liverpool and Division of Orthoptics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, GB
About David

FRCS FRCOpth DO

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Abstract

Aim: To review the current literature on long-term ophthalmic deficits and behavioural and/or cognitive outcomes occurring in low birth weight (LBW) children and to determine whether there is any link between the ophthalmic deficits and functional out­come.

Methods: A literature search was performed focusing mainly on publications from the past 10 years.

Results: LBW children are at an increased risk of a large number of ophthalmic deficits, including reduced visual functions (acuity, visual field, colour vision, stereo-acuity and contrast sensitivity), increased prevalence of strabismus and all types of refractive error. These deficits are not restricted to the smallest children; they can occur with increased frequency in nil LBW children. As a group LBNV children have increased risk of cognitive and behavioural deficits, which can affect them through­out their education. There is evidence of an associa­tion between ophthalmic outcome and many aspects of functional ability (e.g. IQ, reading ability). Further research is required to discover whether there is a common aetiology.

Conclusion: The evidence discussed supports the need for long-term ophthalmic monitoring, and treatment where necessary, due to the potential impact of LBW on education and development. Currently there is no standardised approach for this. Further discussion is required to optimise the long-term care of all LBW children.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.22599/bioj.226
How to Cite: Wong, V., O’Connor, A.R., Newsham, D., Knox, P.C. and Clark, D., 2008. The relationship between ophthalmic deficits and functional ability in low birth weight children. British and Irish Orthoptic Journal, 5, pp.32–38. DOI: http://doi.org/10.22599/bioj.226
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Published on 01 Jan 2008.
Peer Reviewed

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